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primary topic: Government
secondary topics: Election Law

STAR RATING — CLICK TO RATE
78%
BIPARTISAN RATING

Members of Congress must proudly display the brand trademark of any corporation that donates more than $999 to their campaign fund. The larger the donation the bigger the font. Any donation over $5000 has to be large enough to be read by a camera while filming their talking head.

The largest sponsors get marquee position over their heart. The next largest on their hat. If no room is left down their arms, then patches can run down each leg.

Some Congress members may have to get creative because of lack of space, and paint the bottoms of their shoes. Apropos for treading over their constituents because they are bought and paid for by the people they are supposed to be regulating.

Some of you may think this is a joke. It's not. Elected officials and candidates would have to wear this clothing at official campaign events and while Congress is in session.

This goes for Presidential candidates, too.

We dare pairs of Democrats and Republicans to enter this bill into both chambers and co-sponsor the legislation. Let's put this nonsense behind us. And we're not talking about this Act.





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