Make Veterans Day Election Day

formerly Rediscover America Act

sponsored by aGREATER.US • co-sponsors: (1)Become a Co-sponsor

primary topic: Election Law
secondary topics: Equality, Government

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BIPARTISAN RATING

I was totally convinced when I heard this idea, I now support Veteran's Day as Election Day. But the logic of this earlier piece still holds. What better thank you to honor our Veterans? The only valid argument I've ever heard for why Election Day is not a national holiday is that it would drain too much Gross National Product (GNP) from the economy.

Having a national holiday for someone who claimed to discover a land already known to its indigenous people seems far less important than making democracy front and center at least every two years.

In the off year we would actually have an extra day of GDP growth by having one less holiday. Or better yet, we could make the off year still a holiday called Rediscover America Day, by celebrating every American's contribution to a greater U.S.

Or moving voting to an entire weekend, with the Monday after being Rediscover America Day to finish counting and certifying the results. Exit polling should be outlawed, as should announcing state winners before the polls are closed in all 50 States.

Op-eds

election day

by Reynardine on 11/07/12

Severe weather discourages turnout, and that is why I think Election Day should be moved to the third of July, and be made part of the Fourth of July holiday. Inauguration Day could then be held on Labor Day, when the weather is normally clement. All but hospital crew, emergency workers, and those essential to plant maintenance should have the day off, and those latter should have early/absentee ballots available. Anyone who would be eligible for jury duty should be required to vote (e.g., a citizen, able-bodied, under 70, and not put to undue hardship)

Columbus Day

by Jack on 01/22/12

Columbus day should be scrapped from the American holiday list.

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